Virginia Carraway Stark is in the House!

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Next on our author interview series, StarkLight Press talks with Virginia Carraway Stark, whose writing resume is rivalled only by her acumen in helping fellow authors find and refine their mots justes.  You can find her at the sites listed below!

1. Tell us a little bit about yourself and what you’ve been up to in the past few years.

The past few years have been a time of change and acceptance for me. A lot has changed and I’ve had to adapt to a lot of new things. I’ve endured betrayals from friends that I thought I would always have in my life and made new friends that I never imagined being in my life. Through it all; I’ve kept on writing.

I think the biggest thing that’s changed for me is that I’ve had to take a walk in the wilds. I had to take some time of introspection and quietude and get to know myself all over again after the things I’ve been through in life. I’ve explored myself deeply and I’ve written profoundly about my family and my childhood. I’ve explored the world through others perspectives while keeping the writings private except for a very few, trusted friends and family.

Nevertheless I do have a lot of new publications. I have several drabbles coming from Black Hare Press, a new novel coming from New Moon Press, and I have the third book in Verna’s Saga coming out as well as the fourth novel in my ‘Daughter’s Series’ starring the always popular Sasha Wheaton. Interspersed is the novel, ‘DoYou?’ which explores some of the concepts looked into in the collaborative novel Space Stranded and problems with anti-matter beings meeting matter beings. The SegDeb Galaxy is explored by Sasha and ‘Shroom.

My bookshelf has swelled to bursting with the coming releases of The Decay of Man and the release of Gendler’s Landing.
The personal set of based on true biographies that I’ve written about my family will also be coming soon, Preacher Man being the first and based on the life of my deceased elder brother. Coming close on the heels of that will be the story of my mixed race half sister.

Recently I’ve done interviews for Joshua Pantescellara’s award winning Vlog and been on a panel for historical fiction for CyCon.

After this April’s poetry month I also have enough poems to release an illustrated book of poetry, my second book of poetry that is only my own writing. I’ve been part of many poetry anthologies but having one just for me is always very special!

2. Explain for our audience a little bit about the inspiration for your tale, and the themes that inform it.

I contributed a few stories to StarkLight 5, but I think the one I’ll address is “Looking Glass”. The inspiration for it came from a series of dreams. I think it’s probably an unusual thing to dream about being summoned by a Pope who wants to use your wings for spells and bathing in a pool of mercury… but that’s just me!

This was a series of dreams that started many years ago and I felt a close relationship to many of the people in the world of the past. I’ve tried to pinpoint it to what Pope it would likely have been, but everything is all a dream. I’m pretty sure it’s a highly offensive story, but I’ve given up all thought of not offending people. I’ve learned in life that someone is always going to be unhappy by something that one does, so one might as well do as one pleases.

It’s liberating when you get past the depth of pettiness people can go to!

3. What’s your preferred method for writing: computer/smartphone, typewriter, hand, voice transcription? Tell us the most unusual place you ever wrote down a tale- in the elevator at work, on horseback, in a crowded subway?

My favourite place to write is on my laptop, ideally in a nest of cushions. I often write on my notepad on my phone or in my bullet journal or on any scrap of paper that’s handy when desperate. The most unusual place that I wrote was to write nearly an entire screenplay in between making lattes at Starbucks. I wrote it all on those brown, recycled napkins and some on my arms and hands when I ran low on napkins. It wasn’t even quiet, it was during the Christmas season and Starbucks was a madhouse. Thankfully I had an understanding manager and I was able to keep up with orders as well as writing so I didn’t get into trouble! My screenplay did go to Cannes, but that particular one didn’t get made into a movie…yet!

4. Where do you like to go best to recharge your creative batteries?

Nature is best. Animals are definitely a plus. The best place to go is to the other worlds that I imagine with my husband and creative partner. We met creating and we have continued creating together for many years now. There’s something about the way our minds meld and merge beautiful and magical worlds and characters that is like nothing else.

If I was to pick anything, I would say, with my husband, in the trees, by the water and or in the water. That’s my bliss.

5. What, in your opinion is author kryptonite? (antithetical to the creative writing process)

Reading too much about what people think about you. The worst thing is to let that influence you. I think that’s why so many television shows get punched with the suck fairy. People go through Google and FB etc to find out what people think about their writing and they lose control over their worlds. It’s really easy to get ‘feedback’ that is poisonous. Pick your feedback carefully and reject the stuff that sounds like crap. Be the ruler of your own worlds and people.

6. What are your three favorite mainstream books, and what are your three favorite indie/independently published works?

I’m going to give my three favorite mainstream authors: CS Lewis, JRR Tolkien and Richard Adams… although there are a lot more and I could probably go on and on! Indie authors are a little bit more difficult because a lot of them started off Indie and quickly became more mainstream. I tend to think of them as Indie more because they are friends than because of the nature of their writing. I really enjoy a lot of the writers from Writer Punk, I’ve published with them and always look forward to picking up the book at the end and reading everyone’s work. Robert Sawyer is by no means Indie, but he’s a friend along with Randy McCharles who also has a conventional contract, still, being more chummy, I’d list them as ‘Indie’. My absolute favorite is my bias but it’s absolutely true, my husband. He’s a wonderful writer and I can always count on co-writing with him without ever being let down. His novels are superb and his science fiction is the hard, well developed kind that could actually turn into real technology one day. His characters have seduced me a thousand times over and there’s no one whose work I’d rather read… not even Tolkien!

7. What is the last movie you saw? Give our authors a brief review.

The last movie that I watched was Solo… it was, umm, okay. It wasn’t as bad as I thought it was going to be from the review that I had heard, I think that most people didn’t like it because there was a total lack of Jedi and clearly written intending for most of the questions to be answered in a sequel. The actor who played Hans did a good job of it, his voice was eerily like Harrison Ford’s voice and he may possibly have been cloned off of Harrison Ford at some point to play the role… well, it’s science fiction, anything is possible!

8. What are your next big projects, so that our audience can keep an eye out for them.

I have a lot of projects coming out soon! The Family Series, The Daughter Series, a whole lot of short stories and poetry, the Royal Maze series… gosh… yeah, lots. Once I bring out all the things I’ve been working on in private over the past year or so it’s going to be a deluge!

Bio:

Virginia Carraway Stark has published numerous novels. She has been part of dozens of anthologies, collaborations, guest blogs, drabbles and has written screenplays that starred Rowdy Roddy Piper and Nick Mancuso. She has upcoming releases from a variety of presses including Dark Moon Publishing, Simon and Schuster, Black Hare Press and StarkLight Press. Virginia enjoys new writing experiences. She has taken part of many writing marathons both for poetry and novels. She’s a regular for the yearly novel writing exercise NaNoWriMo, the 24 hour poetry marathon and the 3 day novel writing competition. She writes a poem a day for poetry month and once went three years writing at least a poem a day. Some of her poems have been turned into songs. She has even contributed to online ‘choose your own adventure’ series! Virginia has won awards for her novels and poetry, her works have been part of other award winning series and nominated for her essays, blogging and other writing. She is well known for her passion her spirit of adventure both on and off the page. Her stories range from science fiction. Supernatural, horror and the true stories of her life, historical books (one of which was endorsed by the Prime Minister of Canada as well as the Army Corp of Engineers) or studies of the paranormal. You can find her by Googling her or at www.virginiastark.wordpress.com,

on Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/Virginiacarrawaystark/

and @tweetsbyvc. She loves to get fan mail and to take part in new adventures in writing and always, to share her passion with the world.

 

Thanks for taking the time to fill out our StarkLight Volume 5 Questionnaire!

Alfie Elkins Returns!

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Back from what was recently a tropical paradise and now is being scouted as a possible location for the shooting of “World War Three”, Alfie Elkins shares with StarkLight Press a little about his story, based on his time in Venezuela, his past and his difficulties in getting binders.

1. Tell us a little bit about yourself and what you’ve been up to in the past few years.

I started out as a bank clerk in London, then took a teaching degree and taught in public school for a number of years. I then went (perhaps stupidly) to a first aid course so I could help out on excursion trips, and got hooked on medicine. I then became a paramedical specialist with the NHS, and a few years ago, I moved to Venezuela to help them to revamp their emergent care services.

I’ve spent the past two years in Venezuela helping overhaul a public health paramedic corps that is now in shambles due to the current unrest. So, time well spent. Hopefully some of the procedural changes and policies we’ve developed are still preserved and the improved work culture will restore itself once the turmoil is through. Then it would be a good use of time.

Currently, I’m in Manitoba, resting with some mates of mine and keeping one eye on the river levels, because flooding is the last thing I need to round out this long, strange trip of mine!

2. Explain for our audience a little bit about the inspiration for your tale, and the themes that inform it.

Venezuela was a trippy time, and a peculiar place to me. I had no idea how riddled with folk voodoo, magic and superstitiousness it would be- so much so, that it bumped up against my work life as a paramedic. People would shake sticks with little things on them at me. They would prevent me from saving someone until an offering had been completely burned. They would leave little gifts outside the paramedic building (cigarettes, whisky, weed, other things, food (areppas, hallaca, mondongo bowls etc) out for us. There were hundreds, perhaps thousands of little favelaways and dark nooks and corners in Caracas alone, let alone in the other areas of the cities in Venezuela.

I had been helping Tony and Virginia write on the Tales from Space Continuing Stories (I love that series! and working on it is a true pleasure) when I had a truly bizarre encounter with another Brit. It was eerily similar to the sort of thing that we have been injecting into the ultimately doomed GAGA universe, (I don’t want to give too much away here, but let it be known that ‘this sort of thing’ we are writing on gives the GAGA new hope, and not in a Star Trek IV kind of way, but a holy sh*t, this opens up everything! kind of way). I started writing a journal entry about it (as I had been continuing to keep a kind of regular accounting of the time I’d been having, and it turned into my story, Nueve Dedos, Pellirojo.

The whole time was very surreal when the encounter happened, and the writing time after- one of those weird times when you think, is this the Neverending Story? Am I  writing reality? Don’t know, but I’m very grateful to StarkLight Press for keeping so much of the espanol intact, as it cannot be truly separated from the story.

3. What’s your preferred method for writing: computer/smartphone, typewriter, hand, voice transcription? Tell us the most unusual place you ever wrote down a tale- in the elevator at work, on horseback, in a crowded subway?

The past few years, whatever is handy. Since I joined the NHS, I’ve been writing story ideas and things on abdominal pad wrappers, tissue boxes or what-have-you. In Venezuela, I had a notebook, and was able to use the smartphone, but with increasing irregularity in my cloud access, I moved more to hand writing and note-taking again. Which was refreshing. I can thoroughly recommend it- I miss handwriting!

4. Where do you like to go best to recharge your creative batteries?

Somewhere quiet, and ideally a little out-of-the-way. Which is how I met el estrano in my story. Ideally, I’m a night hawk, so I like it after dark, places that were bustling, now quiet. Soaking up the residual hustly bustly in the nighttime seems to help inspire and organize my thoughts. Or give me some!

5. What, in your opinion is author kryptonite? (antithetical to the creative writing process)

Overthinking, and overcomparison. Definitely. Also, I bloody hate autocorrect and that new Google finish function. It’s great for driving the flow right off!

6. What are your three favorite mainstream books, and what are your three favorite indie/independently published works?

I like Robert Ludlum, and Agatha Christie, and Kyril Bonfiglioli. Any of them (I know I had to pick books, but I’m going to be broadly incorrect!) I have to say that indie works are great, and I love to peruse them whenever possible, but the Tales from Space universe is just phenomenally detailed and well-plotted, with characters and scope that stick in your head, no matter how preoccupying your day has been, which keeps me coming back to the series and also pestering the core group of authors for more.

7. What is the last movie you saw? Give our authors a brief review.

Speaking of Bonfiglioli, I finally got to watch Mortdecai, which was, wow, not one of Depp’s better performances. I think it was cinematographically a good representation of the books, with the exception of the over-CGI’d location cards (but hey, Johnny Depp had to earn his money by badly Britishly narrating something, right? It was a book, after all).

I thought that Ewan McGregor just nailed Inspector Martland, however, and the scenes involving the Inspector were just delightfully paced and worked! It was like watching a fan edit of the movie of Bonfiglioli’s work, with the real movie being about the case, and then all these strange fan-acted scenes injected in between of someone in a bathrobe mincing about, pretending to be Charlie Mortdecai.

I would watch a series based on Martland and the international MI-6 angle, by the way, Netflix.

8. What are your next big projects, so that our audience can keep an eye out for them.

I’m working on a memoir of my time in Central America, which blends what I’ve researched and seen first hand of the local culture with my own time there. Untitled yet, but I hope it’ll be ready for full-color publication in 2020.

Also, a few short stories for the next Tales from Space anthology, as well as some independent stories from other worlds in which I’ve written a few times before.

Most excitingly, I think, I’m partaking in The Irregulars, Part 2, which is set to be a really rollicking ride through the world of international espionage, psychic operations of governments and- believe it or not- cybersecurity, biometrics and Celtic culture! Can’t say much on that, but I’m writing with Van Fleming, Will Norton (an old mate of mine), Leanne Caine, Krista Michelle, Tony Stark and Virginia Carraway Stark as well! It’s going to be a real spot of fun, that one!

 

Thanks for taking the time to respond to our questions, Alfie! You can find his story, “Nueuve Dedos, Pellirojo”, in StarkLight Volume 5.

StarkLight 5 Interview Series Begins

We kick off our series of author interviews for StarkLight Volume 5 with Anthony Stark’s answers to our print interview. Look for the rest of our author interviews coming out throughout April and May for this fifth volume of short stories from StarkLight Press.

Jerome, our StarkLight Short Story Anthology Mascot, presides over our books, and our interview series. Look for a stunning new cover reveal from our plucky and intrepid story gargoyle, coming in May!

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Please take a few minutes to include all of your latest author contact information:

I’m not really social media-ing at the present, but you can find creative work on our science fiction platform,

https://www.talesfromspace.net

and at my private blog

https://www.tonydoesstuff.wordpress.com

1. Tell us a little bit about yourself and what you’ve been up to in the past few years.

I’m a former full-time EMR and Coroner’s Service worker who has been taking time out to work with my family. I have a background in Electrical Engineering and literature, and have recently begun studying Global Health and Crisis Management with the University of Glasgow and Johns Hopkins. This is a fascinating and complex field to study, and as horrible as it sounds, it’s very good to learn, from an author’s point of view, how the crisis management deployment tree functions, and has functioned, throughout the 20th and 21st Centuries. I’ve also been doing a fair bit of artwork, having just finished a full-color illustrated heptametric poem called The Lament of the White Star. I am also in process with a Scottish Folk rhyme that I’ve turned into a ballad, The Morphie Kelpy. This is also fully illustrated.

Following the success of our 75th Anniversary Alaska Highway Photo Book, I became inspired to write and illustrate more in tandem; the photos were fun, but I wanted to create my own.

2. Explain for our audience a little bit about the inspiration for your tale, and the themes that inform it.

I was inspired by recent investigations into the paleolithic, following a long-standing, two year study into global human history, its commonalities and its deviations from a lifestyle more in step with our bodies and our evolution, well, away from such things and off in different ways. I also quite like Time Team, and so it became a natural progression in my mind to combine one of StarkLight Press’s most effective precipitating event-makers, Madison, as a way to boost someone who was filming a segment on a show such as this, back into the era they were thinking. It was a good way to put some of the findings into practice, and see how things would have worked out and looked in such a time.

3. What’s your preferred method for writing: computer/smartphone, typewriter, hand, voice transcription? Tell us the most unusual place you ever wrote down part or all of a tale- in the elevator at work, on horseback, in a crowded subway?

I prefer the computer, but also I like handwriting; however, the transcription to computer format for publishing is too time-consuming. The strangest place I wrote part of a tale was in an MTC (Mobile Treatment Center) on a jobsite where they were laying pipeline down a nearly vertical incline. Half the time, as spotter, I had to keep an eye on the drone my company had for the virtual viewing of the crew. This was when they were laying in the pipe sections themselves; had to have a separate set of eyes. The rest of the time, between the crane actually putting in the pipe, the drone was unnecessary. So I worked on a story, part of The Androsian Question, which is a Tales from Space novel. Then, about once an hour for ten or fifteen minutes, I piloted this little quad-copter. Very Galactic Armed Forces. Very nice.

4. Where do you like to go best to recharge your creative batteries?

Nature. Outside, with trees, and ideally some form of water. Mountains are nice. Even a nice tended garden is good; if I’m desperate, I stick my head out the door under the starlight for a few minutes.

5. What, in your opinion is author kryptonite? (antithetical to the creative writing process)

I’d have to say, media- social media like Facebook, and mass-produced fodder. I think that feedback is good, in many respects. I think taking in something with a high-production value is good, to see what people are being taught to think, and how to eat the memetics of common life. However, as far as feedback goes, there’s a difference between a good solid edit of the work for continuity, sense, syntax and grammar, etc, and actual back-seat writing. If you’ve got a good plan, write it. If you don’t, then you can hash it around. This is the point where mass-produced items come into play. People either get so nervous about the ‘it’s been done’ or ‘this is just a mash-up of a) and b)’ that they forget there’s only so many types of stories, and only so many bloody interesting ones. There will be some overlap. Listening to sour grapes, or excited parallel drawing, or worrying about either, is ineffective.

Writing is ultimately an activity between you and your Maker, I think, and it can be glossed up, edited, synced or mashed into something pulpy and acceptish, but first you should write what you really, truly feel, even if it’s utterly reductive, fan-fictioney claptrap. Somewhere along the line you’ll get other people’s big shiny shows out of your head, and see what you were actually saying… and then the writing can begin.

6. What are your three favorite mainstream books, and what are your three favorite indie/independently published works?

I like a lot of non-fiction, but for fiction I like The Lord of the Rings, Anne of Green Gables, and Wodehouse’s Jeeves and Wooster series. I really enjoy the works of Shelley, Chaucer and Auden, as well.

For independent works, I like a lot of the fan works that have been put out in the Tales from Space universe (Jorge Stuart’s expansion of the Ruiz dynasty as President of the Galaxy, for example, and Virginia Carraway Stark’s expansion of the Hoshido era during the First Corporation Wars) , as well as G.W. Renshaw’s works on Veronica, super spy, and I love what I’ve read of Van Fleming’s upcoming series.

7. What is the last movie you saw? Give our authors a brief review.

The last movie I saw was an old Julian Sands flick, RomaSanta. Girl meets wolf- Too bad the Inquisition was there.

8. What are your next big projects, so that our audience can keep an eye out for them.

I’m partway through a backstory to some of the new characters (protagonist and antagonist) in volume 2 of The Irregulars. I mean, really back story. Yet another chance to delve into some ideas and wonderings about the ancient past.

I’m working on a tale of the possible end of the Telamer, the messianic alien race from the eponymously named Telamer system, who kicked out the Maitre alien invasion force in the 21st Century on Old Earth. Can the last of their failing race be saved, or will they die, and leave the Galactic Association of Globes and Asteroids in a chaos of power struggles and decay? Only the intrepid team from Detach Detachment- and their mushroom- can find out what’s the real story.

I’m also working on a story about Nick Goodfrey, and what happened to him after the second alien invasion of the GAGA, which ended the Tales from Space Universe, and scattered protagonists and antagonists alike across time, space and dimensions. Oh, and Universes, also.

There’s also a set of seven full-color picture books about a fantastic set of worlds with their own laws and ways of organizing reality. But that might take a while- illustrating is much more time-consuming than taking a picture and putting it in a layout.

Poetry Month Continues

Nearly halfway through April- poetry Month- and StarkLight Press would like to congratulate all of our marathoners on their stirring and thought-provoking poems! Thanks to everyone who applied to enter our writer’s circle for the contest, and congratulations to those who have engaged on our poem-a-day endeavor.

Our poets for our marathon will have their work published in our upcoming Poetry Month anthology… which of course will be coming out after May begins 🙂

We encourage everyone to try to write one poem at least for April, and to try to expand your poetic comfort zone with this (inexhaustive) list of poetry styles from around the world, thanks to Wikipedia:

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Time for a Little Ordo ab Chao-

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With the tumultuous climate in the world, it occurs to us that there’s no time better to announce a poetry anthology!

Since April is approaching, and spring along with it, we hope to compile a poetry anthology in the interval, and provide some beauty, liberty and elegance of phrase to the melee.

We are including long and short poetic works on any subject, provided the content is of aPG-13 sort of calibre, and free from choleric discourse, please.

Meter is open-ended; we encourage exploration into a variety of poetic styles beyond the standard, 21st Century styles.

We have sixteen contributors’ spots available, with up to three contributions each.

Those poets selected for inclusion in our poetry anthology will be promoted through StarkLight Press and its social media and print media networks. Interviews with our poets will be included as part of our online promotion of this work.

 

To that end, here are some links to some great lists of poetic styles:

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Don’t break your brain with these entrancing poetic styles- heart before style any day!

Please send queries or submissions to starklightdesk@gmail.com, along with a brief bio and/or links to your websites.

Our submission call ends May 15, 2019, or when our sixteen slots are filled. However, poetic submissions will also be considered for our subsequent anthologies, as well as slots in our StarkLight Short Story series.

 

Tony Stark,

Publisher and CEO,

StarkLight Press.

 

 

StarkLight Talks with Lee F. Patrick

StarkLight Press sits down with Lee F. Patrick, author of Dark Reflections, a thrilling tale found in our Hallowe’en anthology, Wild, Wicked and Sparkling.

 

1. Tell us a bit about your inspiration for your tale.

The idea of a stalker makes for a creepy tale, but I wondered what might make a stalker worse. They are certainly a horrible thing to endure. However, you can’t slap a restraining order on a reflection! This story was mostly written a few years back and I kept coming back to it, trying to make it better. Psychological horror, for me, trumps slasher horror. Who in their right mind would believe what Francie is going through?

2. What draws you to the Hallowe’en season?

I enjoy fall as my favourite season. The ideas of the old celebrations of honouring the dead, and that it’s possible to cross between this world and another one is fertile ground for my subconscious. I’ve written some Celtic style poems and short stories with the same sort of theme.

3. Tell us about what would make the best Hallowe’en party ever.

I’m not a big costume party fan, but having a bonfire out in the woods, staying up all night to watch the stars would be wonderful. We’d just have to remember NOT to chase any white stags that happen along. Or, maybe we should.

4. Who has inspired you to not just write, but to keep writing?

I started reading when I was young and my parents gave my sister Lesley and I access to the Science Fiction Book Club, so we read Heinlein, Asimov, McCaffrey, Norton and a host of others. I still have some of those books.

I’ve been writing not very seriously since the late-1980’s as an alternate to my hard science day job. From there, ideas kept knocking on the inside of my head demanding to be let loose. Lots of projects were started and then languished as I started writing on the next idea, or because I wasn’t sure how to build the plot and believable characters. I decided to get serious and publish last year. Since then, I’ve published a thriller novel (Alter Egos), and had three short stories/poems published. Dark Reflections is the third (Thanks to Starklight Press!!). Another story was accepted and is awaiting publication.

A big bonus is my husband, G.W. Renshaw, is also an author. I did the 3-Day Novel contest years back and he was my support staff. He made sure I had food and tea and quiet to write in. Now, he’s also the tech guru who keeps updating templates and helping with all sorts of weird issues with covers and formatting.

The Imaginative Fiction Writers Association, which I’ve been part of for many years, gives inspiration and information of many kinds. When Words Collide also gives me lots of contact with other authors and folks who love to read.

5. Where can people find your work and more about you as an author?

I have a FaceBook page under Lee F. Patrick, and of course, at Amazon. A website is in the planning phase. The ideas and writing keeps intruding on the marketing time.

 

You can find Lee’s tale in Wild, Wicked and Sparkling, available now at the StarkLight Press Bookstore or on Amazon here:

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Avis

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Following many inquiries as to the existence of a photo book commemorating the 2016 Mystery Art Auction, StarkLight Press would like to definitively state that it has withdrawn from the production of the book.

Following the Dawson Creek Art Gallery’s 2016 Mystery Art Auction, many poets and some artists felt that their work was neither properly acknowledged nor recorded by the Gallery. In order to smooth over hard feelings, StarkLight Press had offered to compile gratis a photo book featuring the paintings and poems included in the fundraiser for the Dawson Creek Art Gallery. Copies would be available for purchase online and at the Gallery with all proceeds going toward the Art Gallery itself. The layout and design of the book were to be performed by the Press once high quality digital images and poems were provided by the Art Gallery curator.

After four months, in January 2017, the publisher had been stonewalled by the curator, Kit Fast, and had obtained only one low resolution brochure with the pictures inside. It came to the attention of the publisher that Mr. Fast had not informed anyone from the SPCAC or other members of the Gallery about the production of the book, when at a public meeting, people had no knowledge that this book had been trying to get itself made since the event in October.

After a lengthy apology delivered over the phone, Mr. Fast promised to provide release forms and high quality digital images and poems from the artists not directly connected to StarkLight Press.

As of September 2017, only two-thirds of the release forms have been provided. There has been no contact from the Dawson Creek Art Gallery with regard to this matter. Although we refuse to speculate as to the reasons why the curator and Art Gallery have so greviously sabotaged what could have been a valuable opportunity for the local arts community, we recognize that there are serious problems with bullying, clique-ism and discrimination against Persons with Disabilities in the Dawson Creek Arts Community.

Unfortunately, due to the bad behaviour of a few, all the artists and poets involved in the 2016 Mystery Art Auction go without a professionally-made and promoted commemorative book.

Therefore, following disrespectfully unprofessional interactions with the Dawson Creek Art Gallery, StarkLight Press would like to formally withdraw its offer to commemorate the 2016 Mystery Art Auction with a fundraising book. We are also officially stating we will not be making any commemorative books for the Art Gallery in future, unless a more professional and courteous approach is taken.

While StarkLight Press regrets the fact that it cannot help poets and artists who did not receive proper acknowledgment from the 2016 Mystery Art Auction, it nevertheless has exhausted every opportunity to try to provide a lasting record of the hard work and creativity that went into the event.